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Vesica API Documentation

RESTful API

The Vesica API is a RESTful API. We take a responsible approach to creating software that meets all your needs and responds to the challenges of the media space. If you have questions about the operation of our software - contact support if you are looking for content to fill, use the services and buy term papers online. Please note the following:

  • You can currently only get data out of Vesica with the API. This means only GET calls are currently supported.
  • The returned response is always formatted as JSON.

 

Passing Request Data

Request data is passed to the API by passing appropriate parameters to the API endpoints. These can be formatted as a simple array or a JSON object. The documentation for each API endpoint will contain more detail on the parameters accepted by the call. Because the GET method is the only supported method at this time, you can also pass the parameters to your HTTP request.

Supported Parameters

  • user_api_key (required)
  • account_api_key (required)
  • limit (optional)
  • offset (optional)

 

API Endpoints

All API URLs listed in this documentation are relative to https://api.vesica.ws/. For example, the /pieces/123 API call is reachable at https://api.vesica.ws/pieces/123.

Supported Endpoints

The following endpoints are currently supported. Please click on each endpoint to see sample JSON requests and responses.

 

/pieces - Returns a list of pieces in your account

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Example Request

                        GET https://api.vesica.ws/pieces?user_api_key=123_akAsbuenASDWEads
                                                         &account_api_key=234_aoYOWFnweivn
                                                         &limit=25
                                                         &offset=0
                    

Example Request - JSON

                       {
                            "user_api_key": "123_auRNjALDN",
                            "account_api_key": "235_UIJdaiuU",
                            "limit": 25,
                            "offset": 5
                        }
                    

Example Response

{
  "code": 200,
  "status": "OK",
  "data": [
    {
      "id": "152",
      "about": {
        "accession_no": "PT2447865845",
        "accession_date": "2011-05-08 00:00:00",
        "name": "Mona Lisa",
        "description": "Mona Lisa (also known as La Gioconda or La Joconde) is a sixteenth-century portrait painted in oil on a poplar panel by Leonardo di ser Piero da Vinci during the Renaissance in Florence, Italy. The work is currently owned by the Government of France and is on display at the Musée du Louvre in Paris under the title Portrait of Lisa Gherardini, wife of Francesco del Giocondo. The painting is a half-length portrait and depicts a seated woman (is almost unanimous that she's Lisa del Giocondo) whose facial expression is frequently described as enigmatic.",
        "symbolism": "Some believe that the slight smile is an indication that the subject is hiding a secret. The ambiguity of the subject's expression, the monumentality of the composition, and the subtle modeling of forms and atmospheric illusionism were novel qualities that have contributed to the continuing fascination and study of the work. Many critics note that with the Monda Lisa, Leonardo painted the most famous portrait of all time."
      },
      "types": [
        {
          "type": "Painting"
        }
      ],
      "techniques": [
        {
          "technique": "Sfumato"
        }
      ],
      "materials": [
        {
          "material": "Wood"
        }
      ],
      "colours": [],
      "dimensions": [],
      "weight": [],
      "artists": [
        {
          "artist": "Leonardo da Vinci"
        }
      ],
      "history": {
        "countries": [
          {
            "country": "France"
          }
        ],
        "regions": [
          {
            "region": "Western Europe"
          }
        ],
        "dynasties": [],
        "map_data": {
          "address": "Paris",
          "latitude": "48.8566140",
          "longitude": "2.3522219"
        },
        "dates": {
          "year_of_origin_from": "1503",
          "year_of_origin_from_anno_domini": "AD",
          "year_of_origin_to": "1506",
          "year_of_origin_to_anno_domini": "AD"
        },
        "history": The Mona Lisa has survived for more than 500 years, and an international commission convened in 1952 noted that "the picture is in a remarkable state of preservation. This is partly due to the result of a variety of conservation treatments the painting has undergone. A detailed analysis in 1933 by Madame de Gironde revealed that earlier restorers had "acted with a great deal of restraint. Nevertheless, applications of varnish made to the painting had darkened even by the end of the 16th century, and an aggressive 1809 cleaning and re-varnish removed some of the uppermost portion of the paint layer, resulting in a washed-out appearance to the face of the figure. Despite the treatments, the Mona Lisa has been well-cared for throughout its history, and although the panel's warping caused the curators "some worry", the 2004-05 conservation team was optimistic about the future of the work"
      },
      "labels": [
        {
          "label": "Mona Lisa - Leonardo da VnciRef# 5546154648",
          "note": "See record# 552545"
        }
      ],
      "tags": [],
      "related_pieces": [],
      "administrative": [],
      "acquisitions": [],
      "loans": [],
      "finance": [],
      "insurance": [],
      "shipping": [],
      "conservation": [],
      "exhibitions": [],
      "images": {
        "0": {
          "picture_id": "2982",
          "picture_name": "Geometric Panel",
          "picture_desc": "Royal Museu, Belgium",
          "picture": "Vesica_152_1392739047",
          "thumb": "Vesica_152_1392739047_sm",
          "extension": "jpg",
          "user_id": "1",
          "piece_id": "152",
          "picture_date_added": "2014-02-18 15:57:27",
          "picture_date_last_updated": "2014-02-18 15:57:58",
          "file_size": "310657",
          "date": "0000-00-00",
          "photographer_id": "0",
          "copyright": "",
          "location": "",
          "url_www": "xxxxx/account/piece-web/Vesica_152_1392739047.jpg",
          "thumbnail_view": "xxxxx/Vesica_152_1392739047_sm.jpg"
        },
        "default": {
          "picture_id": "372",
          "picture_name": "Mona Lisa by Leonardo da Vinci",
          "picture_desc": "",
          "picture": "Vesica_152_1287679926",
          "thumb": "Vesica_152_1287679926_sm",
          "extension": "jpg",
          "user_id": "1",
          "piece_id": "152",
          "picture_date_added": "2010-10-21 17:52:06",
          "picture_date_last_updated": "2010-10-21 17:52:07",
          "file_size": "",
          "date": "0000-00-00",
          "photographer_id": "0",
          "copyright": "",
          "location": "",
          "url_www": "xxxxx/Vesica_152_1287679926.jpg",
          "thumbnail_view": "xxxxx/Vesica_152_1287679926_sm.jpg"
        }
      },
      "files": [],
      "audio": [],
      "video": [],
      "bibliography": [],
      "vesica_gallery": "1",
      "local_gallery": "1",
      "date_added": "2010-10-21 13:28:36",
      "added_by_user_id": null,
      "added_by_user": "Sarfraz Khan",
      "date_updated": "2014-06-20 13:34:59",
      "updated_by_user_id": null,
      "updated_by_user": "Asif Nawaz",
      "deaccession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00",
      "deaccession": "0"
    },
    {
      "id": "154",
      "about": {
        "accession_no": "TXT10",
        "accession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00",
        "name": "Gareon e la pipe",
        "description": "Early preparations of this work involved positioning the boy in all types of poses that involved standing, sitting or leaning against the wall. After much repositioning of the model, Picasso decided to go with the boy sitting down. Next was how to position the arm, where much time was also spent on the height and angle. Early works do not show any objects other than a pipe being used.
Although Picasso started to paint this picture, he gave it a rest period for about a month. During this time, Picasso decided to finish it off by placing a garland of flowers on the boy's head. It is not known why Picasso decided to do this, but there is a contrast between femininity and masculinity in the picture.", "symbolism": "Le Bateau-Lavoir in Montmartre is where Picasso was living when he painted the picture. Some of the local people made a living in the entertainment industry, such as being clowns or acrobats. Picasso used many local people in his pictures, but little is known about the boy in the picture.
What appears to be fact from comments made from a variety of sources is that the boy was a model in his teen years who hung around Picasso's studio and volunteered to pose for the oil work. Picasso's own comments about the boy were that he was one of the:
“ local types, actors, ladies, gentlemen, delinquents... He stayed there, sometimes the whole day. He watched me work. He loved that. ”
From this comment, suppositions can be made. The first is that Picasso did not want people to know who the boy is, and the second is Picasso did not really know the boy. However, many reports have been made that say the boy is “p’tit Louis”, or "Little Louis"." }, "types": [ { "type": "Painting" } ], "techniques": [ { "technique": "Abstract Expressionism" } ], "materials": [ { "material": "Canvas" }, { "material": "Natural Pigments" } ], "colours": [], "dimensions": [], "weight": [], "artists": [ { "artist": "Pablo Picasso" } ], "history": { "countries": [], "regions": [], "dynasties": [], "map_data": { "address": "Brussels%2C+Belgium", "latitude": "50.8503396", "longitude": "4.3517103" }, "dates": { "year_of_origin_from": "1905", "year_of_origin_from_anno_domini": "AD", "year_of_origin_to": "0", "year_of_origin_to_anno_domini": "AD" }, "history": "The painting was first bought by John Hay Whitney in 1950 for US$30,000.
On May 5, 2004 the painting was sold for US$104,168,000 at Sotheby's auction in New York City. Sotheby’s did not say who bought the painting. However, sources say that it was Guido Barilla, owner of the Barilla Group who bought the painting. At the time, it broke the record for the amount paid for an auctioned painting (when inflation is ignored). The amount, US$104 million, includes the auction price of US$93 million plus the auction house’s commission of about US$11 million.[6] The painting was given a pre-sale estimate of US$70 million by the auction house.
Many art critics have stated that the painting's high sale price has much more to do with the artist's name than with the merit or historical importance of the painting. The Washington Post's article on the sale contained the following characterisation of the reaction:
“ Picasso expert Pepe Karmel, reached in New York the morning after the sale, was waxing wroth about the whole affair. "I'm stunned," he said, "that a pleasant, minor painting could command a price appropriate to a real masterwork by Picasso. This just shows how much the marketplace is divorced from the true values of art."" }, "labels": [], "tags": [], "related_pieces": [], "administrative": [], "acquisitions": [], "loans": [], "finance": [], "insurance": [], "shipping": [], "conservation": [], "exhibitions": [], "images": { "default": { "0": "373", "1": "Front", "2": "", "3": "Vesica_154_1287680130", "4": "Vesica_154_1287680130_sm", "5": "jpg", "6": "10", "7": "154", "8": "2010-10-21 17:55:30", "9": "2010-10-21 17:55:31", "10": "", "11": "0000-00-00", "12": "0", "13": "", "14": "", "picture_id": "373", "picture_name": "Front", "picture_desc": "", "picture": "Vesica_154_1287680130", "thumb": "Vesica_154_1287680130_sm", "extension": "jpg", "user_id": "10", "piece_id": "154", "picture_date_added": "2010-10-21 17:55:30", "picture_date_last_updated": "2010-10-21 17:55:31", "file_size": "", "date": "0000-00-00", "photographer_id": "0", "copyright": "", "location": "", "url_www": "xxxxx/Vesica_154_1287680130.jpg", "thumbnail_view": "xxxxx/Vesica_154_1287680130_sm.jpg" } }, "files": [], "audio": [], "video": [], "bibliography": [], "vesica_gallery": "1", "local_gallery": "1", "date_added": "2010-10-21 17:37:38", "added_by_user_id": null, "added_by_user": "Sarfraz Khan", "date_updated": "2014-06-20 13:34:59", "updated_by_user_id": null, "updated_by_user": "Asif Nawaz", "deaccession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "deaccession": "0" } ] }

 

/pieces/piece_id - Returns details for the specified piece_id

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Example Request

                        GET https://api.vesica.ws/pieces/154?user_api_key=123_akAsbuenASDWEads
                                                         &account_api_key=234_aoYOWFnweivn
                                                         &limit=25
                                                         &offset=0
                    

Example Request - JSON

                       {
                            "user_api_key": "123_auRNjALDN",
                            "account_api_key": "235_UIJdaiuU",
                            "limit": 25,
                            "offset": 5
                        }
                    

Example Response

{
  "code": 200,
  "status": "OK",
  "data": {
    "id": "154",
    "about": {
      "accession_no": "TXT10",
      "accession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00",
      "name": "Gareon e la pipe",
      "description": "Early preparations of this work involved positioning the boy in all types of poses that involved standing, sitting or leaning against the wall. After much repositioning of the model, Picasso decided to go with the boy sitting down. Next was how to position the arm, where much time was also spent on the height and angle. Early works do not show any objects other than a pipe being used.
Although Picasso started to paint this picture, he gave it a rest period for about a month. During this time, Picasso decided to finish it off by placing a garland of flowers on the boy's head. It is not known why Picasso decided to do this, but there is a contrast between femininity and masculinity in the picture.", "symbolism": "Le Bateau-Lavoir in Montmartre is where Picasso was living when he painted the picture. Some of the local people made a living in the entertainment industry, such as being clowns or acrobats. Picasso used many local people in his pictures, but little is known about the boy in the picture.
What appears to be fact from comments made from a variety of sources is that the boy was a model in his teen years who hung around Picasso's studio and volunteered to pose for the oil work. Picasso's own comments about the boy were that he was one of the:
“ local types, actors, ladies, gentlemen, delinquents... He stayed there, sometimes the whole day. He watched me work. He loved that. ”
From this comment, suppositions can be made. The first is that Picasso did not want people to know who the boy is, and the second is Picasso did not really know the boy. However, many reports have been made that say the boy is “p’tit Louis”, or "Little Louis"." }, "types": [ { "type": "Painting" } ], "techniques": [ { "technique": "Abstract Expressionism" } ], "materials": [ { "material": "Canvas" }, { "material": "Natural Pigments" } ], "colours": [ { "colour": "Blue ", "html_code": "#0000FF" }, { "colour": "Brown ", "html_code": "#A52A2A" } ], "dimensions": { "length": "100.00", "height": "22.00", "width": "81.30", "measurement_unit": "centimetres" }, "weight": { "weight": "0.00", "unit_of_weight": "grams" }, "artists": [ { "artist": "Pablo Picasso" } ], "history": { "countries": [], "regions": [], "dynasties": [], "map_data": { "address": "Brussels%2C+Belgium", "latitude": "50.8503396", "longitude": "4.3517103" }, "dates": { "year_of_origin_from": "1905", "year_of_origin_from_anno_domini": "AD", "year_of_origin_to": "0", "year_of_origin_to_anno_domini": "AD" }, "history": "The painting was first bought by John Hay Whitney in 1950 for US$30,000.
On May 5, 2004 the painting was sold for US$104,168,000 at Sotheby's auction in New York City. Sotheby’s did not say who bought the painting. However, sources say that it was Guido Barilla, owner of the Barilla Group who bought the painting. At the time, it broke the record for the amount paid for an auctioned painting (when inflation is ignored). The amount, US$104 million, includes the auction price of US$93 million plus the auction house’s commission of about US$11 million.[6] The painting was given a pre-sale estimate of US$70 million by the auction house.
Many art critics have stated that the painting's high sale price has much more to do with the artist's name than with the merit or historical importance of the painting. The Washington Post's article on the sale contained the following characterisation of the reaction:
“ Picasso expert Pepe Karmel, reached in New York the morning after the sale, was waxing wroth about the whole affair. "I'm stunned," he said, "that a pleasant, minor painting could command a price appropriate to a real masterwork by Picasso. This just shows how much the marketplace is divorced from the true values of art."" }, "labels": [], "tags": [], "related_pieces": [ { "id": "54", "piece_id_a": "155", "piece_id_b": "154" } ], "administrative": { "locations": [], "persons": [], "status": "0", "status_name": false, "ownership_status": "0", "owner_name": false, "restrictions": "" }, "acquisitions": { "notes": "" }, "loans": [], "finance": { "value_from": "0.00", "value_to": "0.00", "transactions": [] }, "insurance": [], "shipping": [], "conservation": [], "exhibitions": [], "images": { "default": { "picture_id": "373", "picture_name": "Front", "picture_desc": "", "picture": "Vesica_154_1287680130", "thumb": "Vesica_154_1287680130_sm", "extension": "jpg", "user_id": "10", "piece_id": "154", "picture_date_added": "2010-10-21 17:55:30", "picture_date_last_updated": "2010-10-21 17:55:31", "file_size": "", "date": "0000-00-00", "photographer_id": "0", "copyright": "", "location": "", "url_www": "xxxxx.jpg", "thumbnail_view": "xxxxx_sm.jpg" } }, "files": [], "audio": [], "video": [], "bibliography": [], "vesica_gallery": "1", "local_gallery": "1", "date_added": "2010-10-21 17:37:38", "added_by_user_id": null, "added_by_user": "Sarfraz Khan", "date_updated": "2014-06-20 13:34:59", "updated_by_user_id": null, "updated_by_user": "Asif Nawaz", "deaccession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "deaccession": "0" } }

&bsp;

/collections - Returns a list of collections in your account

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Example Request

                        GET https://api.vesica.ws/collections?user_api_key=123_akAsbuenASDWEads
                                                         &account_api_key=234_aoYOWFnweivn
                                                         &limit=3
                                                         &offset=0
                    

Example Request - JSON

                       {
                            "user_api_key": "123_auRNjALDN",
                            "account_api_key": "235_UIJdaiuU",
                            "limit": 3,
                            "offset": 5
                        }
                    

Example Response

{
  "code": 200,
  "status": "OK",
  "data": [
    {
      "id": "19",
      "cname": "Works by Raphael",
      "cdescription": "",
      "cdate_created": "2011-04-29 23:38:13",
      "cdate_last_updated": "2014-03-19 16:20:33",
      "cuser_id": "1",
      "cuser_last_updated": "1",
      "caccount_id": "1",
      "clocal_gallery": "1",
      "cvesica_gallery": "0",
      "cphoto": "xxxxx/account/collection-photos/Vesica_Collection_19.jpg",
      "cphoto_view": "xxxxx/account/collection-photos/Vesica_Collection_19.jpg",
      "ctotal_pieces": 28,
      "collection_pieces": [
        {
          "id": "383",
          "about": {
            "accession_no": "",
            "accession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00",
            "name": "Battle of Cascina (Michelangelo)",
            "description": "The painting was commissioned from Michelangelo by Piero Soderini, statesman of the Republic of Florence. It was intended to be a fresco painted on a wall of the Salone dei Cinquecento in Palazzo Vecchio. The opposite wall was to be decorated by Leonardo da Vinci, who was commissioned to depict the Battle of Anghiari. The two battles were notable medieval Florentine victories. The Battle of Cascina was fought on 28 July 1364 between the troops of Florence and Pisa, resulting in victory of the former. A thousand Pisans were killed and two thousand more were captured.

Michelangelo never completed the painting, but did produce a complete cartoon of the composition. The cartoon was copied by several artists, the most notable extant copy being by Michelangelo's pupil Sangallo. Some of Michelangelo's preparatory drawings also survive, along with prints of part of the scene by Marcantonio Raimondi. According to Michelangelo's biographer Giorgio Vasari the original cartoon was deliberately destroyed by Michelangelo's rival Bartolommeo Bandinelli because of his jealousy of its fame.
 ", "symbolism": "Michelangelo depicted a scene at the beginning of the battle when the Florentine army was initially taken by surprise when the Pisans attacked. He depicts Florentine soldiers bathing naked in the river Arno responding to a trumpet which warns them of the sudden Pisan attack. As the soldiers emerge from the river and buckle on their armour, they are threatened by shots from the Pisans. Several soldiers look or point towards the Pisan position to the left. One soldier has apparently been hit and fallen back into the river, while others leap energetically into action.

The chosen episode allowed Michelangelo to depict his favoured topic: the naked male figure in varieties of contrapposto." }, "types": [ { "type": "Painting" } ], "techniques": [], "materials": [ { "material": "Canvas" } ], "colours": [], "dimensions": [], "weight": [], "artists": [ { "artist": "Michelangelo Buonarroti" } ], "history": { "countries": [], "regions": [], "dynasties": [], "map_data": { "address": "", "latitude": "0.0000000", "longitude": "0.0000000" }, "dates": { "year_of_origin_from": "0", "year_of_origin_from_anno_domini": "AD", "year_of_origin_to": "0", "year_of_origin_to_anno_domini": "AD" }, "history": "" }, "labels": [], "tags": [], "related_pieces": [], "administrative": [], "acquisitions": [], "loans": [], "finance": [], "insurance": [], "shipping": [], "conservation": [], "exhibitions": [], "images": { "default": { "picture_id": "614", "picture_name": "Battle of Cascina", "picture_desc": "", "picture": "Vesica_383_1295447419", "thumb": "Vesica_383_1295447419_sm", "extension": "jpg", "user_id": "10", "piece_id": "383", "picture_date_added": "2011-01-19 14:30:19", "picture_date_last_updated": "2011-01-19 14:30:19", "file_size": "", "date": "0000-00-00", "photographer_id": "0", "copyright": "", "location": "", "url_www": "xxxxx/Vesica_383_1295447419.jpg", "thumbnail_view": "xxxxx/Vesica_383_1295447419_sm.jpg" } }, "files": [], "audio": [], "video": [], "bibliography": [], "vesica_gallery": "1", "local_gallery": "1", "date_added": "2011-01-19 14:12:07", "added_by_user_id": null, "added_by_user": "Sarfraz Khan", "date_updated": "2014-06-20 13:35:00", "updated_by_user_id": null, "updated_by_user": "Sarfraz Khan", "deaccession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "deaccession": "0" }, { "id": "239", "about": { "accession_no": "", "accession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "name": "Galatea (Raphael)", "description": "The Triumph of Galatea is a fresco masterpiece completed in 1512 by the Italian painter Raphael for the Villa Farnesina in Rome.
The Farnesina was built for the Sienese banker Agostino Chigi, one of the richest men of that age. The Farnese family later acquired and renamed the villa, smaller than the more ostentatious palazzo at the other side of the Tiber. The fresco is a mythological scene of a series embellishing the open gallery of the building, a series never completed which was inspired to the "Stanze per la giostra" of the poet Angelo Poliziano. In Greek mythology, the beautiful Nereid Galatea had fallen in love with the peasant shepherd Acis. Her consort, one-eyed giant, Polyphemus, after chancing upon the two lovers together, lobbed an enormous pillar and killed Acis.

Raphael did not paint any of the main events of the story. He chose the scene of the nymph's apotheosis (Stanze, I, 118-119). Galatea appears surrounded by other sea creatures whose forms are somewhat inspired by Michelangelo, whereas the bright colors and decoration are supposed to be inspired by ancient Roman painting. At the left, a Triton (partly man, partly fish) abducts a sea nymph; behind them, another Triton uses a shell as a trumpet. Galatea rides a shell-chariot drawn by two dolphins.

While some have seen in the model for Galatea the image of the courtesan, Imperia, Agostino Chigi's lover, Raphael's near-contemporary, the artist and art biographer Giorgio Vasari, wrote that Raphael did not mean for Galatea to resemble any one human person, but to represent ideal beauty. Her gaze is directed upward to heaven, reflecting Platonic love.", "symbolism": "Galatea appears surrounded by other sea creatures whose forms are somewhat inspired by Michelangelo, whereas the bright colors and decoration are supposed to be inspired by ancient Roman painting. At the left, a Triton (partly man, partly fish) abducts a sea nymph; behind them, another Triton uses a shell as a trumpet. Galatea rides a shell-chariot drawn by two dolphins.

While some have seen in the model for Galatea the image of the courtesan, Imperia, Agostino Chigi's lover, Raphael's near-contemporary, the artist and art biographer Giorgio Vasari, wrote that Raphael did not mean for Galatea to resemble any one human person, but to represent ideal beauty. Her gaze is directed upward to heaven, reflecting Platonic love." }, "types": [ { "type": "Painting" } ], "techniques": [], "materials": [], "colours": [], "dimensions": [], "weight": [], "artists": [ { "artist": "Raphael" } ], "history": { "countries": [], "regions": [], "dynasties": [], "map_data": { "address": "", "latitude": "0.0000000", "longitude": "0.0000000" }, "dates": { "year_of_origin_from": "1512", "year_of_origin_from_anno_domini": "AD", "year_of_origin_to": "1513", "year_of_origin_to_anno_domini": "AD" }, "history": "Raphael did not paint any of the main events of the story. He chose the scene of the nymph's apotheosis (Stanze, I, 118-119). Galatea appears surrounded by other sea creatures whose forms are somewhat inspired by Michelangelo, whereas the bright colors and decoration are supposed to be inspired by ancient Roman painting. At the left, a Triton (partly man, partly fish) abducts a sea nymph; behind them, another Triton uses a shell as a trumpet. Galatea rides a shell-chariot drawn by two dolphins.

While some have seen in the model for Galatea the image of the courtesan, Imperia, Agostino Chigi's lover, Raphael's near-contemporary, the artist and art biographer Giorgio Vasari, wrote that Raphael did not mean for Galatea to resemble any one human person, but to represent ideal beauty. Her gaze is directed upward to heaven, reflecting Platonic love." }, "labels": [], "tags": [], "related_pieces": [], "administrative": [], "acquisitions": [], "loans": [], "finance": [], "insurance": [], "shipping": [], "conservation": [], "exhibitions": [], "images": { "default": { "picture_id": "459", "picture_name": "Galatea", "picture_desc": "", "picture": "Vesica_239_1291720995", "thumb": "Vesica_239_1291720995_sm", "extension": "jpg", "user_id": "10", "piece_id": "239", "picture_date_added": "2010-12-07 11:23:15", "picture_date_last_updated": "2010-12-07 11:23:15", "file_size": "", "date": "0000-00-00", "photographer_id": "0", "copyright": "", "location": "", "url_www": "xxxxx/Vesica_239_1291720995.jpg", "thumbnail_view": "xxxxx/Vesica_239_1291720995_sm.jpg" } }, "files": [], "audio": [], "video": [], "bibliography": [], "vesica_gallery": "1", "local_gallery": "1", "date_added": "2010-12-07 10:52:16", "added_by_user_id": null, "added_by_user": "Sarfraz Khan", "date_updated": "2014-06-20 13:34:59", "updated_by_user_id": null, "updated_by_user": "Sarfraz Khan", "deaccession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "deaccession": "0" }, { "id": "309", "about": { "accession_no": "", "accession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "name": "A Girl in the Street, Two Coaches in the Background", "description": "A Girl in the Street, Two Coaches in the Background is an oil painting created in 1882 by Vincent van Gogh.", "symbolism": "" }, "types": [ { "type": "Painting" } ], "techniques": [], "materials": [ { "material": "Canvas" } ], "colours": [], "dimensions": [], "weight": [], "artists": [ { "artist": "Vincent van Gogh" } ], "history": { "countries": [], "regions": [], "dynasties": [], "map_data": { "address": "madrid", "latitude": "40.4167754", "longitude": "-3.7037902" }, "dates": { "year_of_origin_from": "1882", "year_of_origin_from_anno_domini": "AD", "year_of_origin_to": "0", "year_of_origin_to_anno_domini": "AD" }, "history": "" }, "labels": [], "tags": [], "related_pieces": [], "administrative": [], "acquisitions": [], "loans": [], "finance": [], "insurance": [], "shipping": [], "conservation": [], "exhibitions": [], "images": { "default": { "picture_id": "536", "picture_name": "A Girl in the Street, Two Coaches in the Background", "picture_desc": "", "picture": "Vesica_309_1294453872", "thumb": "Vesica_309_1294453872_sm", "extension": "jpg", "user_id": "10", "piece_id": "309", "picture_date_added": "2011-01-08 02:31:12", "picture_date_last_updated": "2011-01-08 02:31:12", "file_size": "", "date": "0000-00-00", "photographer_id": "0", "copyright": "", "location": "", "url_www": "xxxxx/Vesica_309_1294453872.jpg", "thumbnail_view": "xxxxx/Vesica_309_1294453872_sm.jpg" } }, "files": [], "audio": [], "video": [], "bibliography": [], "vesica_gallery": "1", "local_gallery": "1", "date_added": "2011-01-08 02:26:25", "added_by_user_id": null, "added_by_user": "Sarfraz Khan", "date_updated": "2014-06-20 13:35:00", "updated_by_user_id": null, "updated_by_user": "Asif Nawaz", "deaccession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "deaccession": "0" }, { "id": "314", "about": { "accession_no": "", "accession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "name": "A Wind-Beaten Tree", "description": "A Wind-Beaten Tree is an oil painting created in 1883 by Vincent van Gogh.", "symbolism": "" }, "types": [ { "type": "Painting" } ], "techniques": [], "materials": [ { "material": "Canvas" } ], "colours": [], "dimensions": [], "weight": [], "artists": [ { "artist": "Vincent van Gogh" } ], "history": { "countries": [], "regions": [], "dynasties": [], "map_data": { "address": "madrid, spain", "latitude": "40.4167754", "longitude": "-3.7037902" }, "dates": { "year_of_origin_from": "1883", "year_of_origin_from_anno_domini": "AD", "year_of_origin_to": "0", "year_of_origin_to_anno_domini": "AD" }, "history": "" }, "labels": [], "tags": [], "related_pieces": [], "administrative": [], "acquisitions": [], "loans": [], "finance": [], "insurance": [], "shipping": [], "conservation": [], "exhibitions": [], "images": { "default": { "picture_id": "541", "picture_name": "A Wind-Beaten Tree", "picture_desc": "", "picture": "Vesica_314_1294676182", "thumb": "Vesica_314_1294676182_sm", "extension": "jpg", "user_id": "10", "piece_id": "314", "picture_date_added": "2011-01-10 16:16:22", "picture_date_last_updated": "2011-01-10 16:16:22", "file_size": "", "date": "0000-00-00", "photographer_id": "0", "copyright": "", "location": "", "url_www": "xxxxx/Vesica_314_1294676182.jpg", "thumbnail_view": "xxxxx/Vesica_314_1294676182_sm.jpg" } }, "files": [], "audio": [], "video": [], "bibliography": [], "vesica_gallery": "1", "local_gallery": "1", "date_added": "2011-01-10 16:12:35", "added_by_user_id": null, "added_by_user": "Sarfraz Khan", "date_updated": "2014-06-20 13:35:00", "updated_by_user_id": null, "updated_by_user": "Asif Nawaz", "deaccession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "deaccession": "0" }, { "id": "351", "about": { "accession_no": "", "accession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "name": "Bacchus (Leonardo)", "description": "Bacchus, formerly Saint John the Baptist, in the Musée du Louvre is based on a drawing by the Italian Renaissance artist Leonardo da Vinci but is presumed to have been executed by an unknown follower, perhaps in Leonardo's workshop. Sidney J. Freedberg assigns the drawing to Leonardo's second Milan period. Among the Lombard painters who have been suggested as possible authors are Cesare da Sesto, Marco d'Oggiono, Francesco Melzi, and Cesare Bernazzano. The painting shows a male figure with garlanded head and leopard skin, seated in an idyllic landscape. He points with his right hand off to the right, and with his left hand grasps his thyrsus.

 ", "symbolism": "The painting originally depicted John the Baptist. In the late seventeenth century, between the years 1683 and 1693, it was overpainted and altered, to serve as Bacchus.

Cassiano dal Pozzo remarked of the painting in its former state, which he saw at Fontainebleau in 1625, that it had neither devotion, decorum nor similitude,] the suavely beautiful, youthful and slightly androgynous Giovannino was so at variance with artistic conventions in portraying the Baptist— neither the older ascetic prophet nor the Florentine baby Giovannino, but a type of Leonardo's invention, of a disconcerting, somewhat ambiguous sensuality, familiar in Leonardo's half-length and upward-pointing Saint John the Baptist, also in the Louvre.

The overpainting transformed the image of St. John into one of a pagan deity, by converting the long-handled cross-like staff of the Baptist to a Bacchic thyrsus and adding a vine wreath. The fur robe is the legacy of John the Baptist, but has been overpainted with leopard-spots relating, like the wreath, to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine and intoxication." }, "types": [ { "type": "Painting" } ], "techniques": [], "materials": [ { "material": "Canvas" }, { "material": "Wood" } ], "colours": [], "dimensions": [], "weight": [], "artists": [ { "artist": "Leonardo da Vinci" } ], "history": { "countries": [], "regions": [], "dynasties": [], "map_data": { "address": "", "latitude": "0.0000000", "longitude": "0.0000000" }, "dates": { "year_of_origin_from": "1510", "year_of_origin_from_anno_domini": "AD", "year_of_origin_to": "1515", "year_of_origin_to_anno_domini": "AD" }, "history": "" }, "labels": [], "tags": [], "related_pieces": [], "administrative": [], "acquisitions": [], "loans": [], "finance": [], "insurance": [], "shipping": [], "conservation": [], "exhibitions": [], "images": { "default": { "picture_id": "580", "picture_name": " Bacchus (Leonardo)", "picture_desc": " The painting originally depicted John the Baptist. In the late seventeenth century, between the years 1683 and 1693, it was overpainted and altered, to serve as Bacchus.Cassiano dal Pozzo remarked of the painting in its former state, which he saw at Fontainebleau in 1625, that it had neither devotion, decorum nor similitude,] the suavely beautiful, youthful and slightly androgynous Giovannino was so at variance with artistic conventions in portraying the Baptist— neither the older ascetic prophet nor the Florentine baby Giovannino, but a type of Leonardo's invention, of a disconcerting, somewhat ambiguous sensuality, familiar in Leonardo's half-length and upward-pointing Saint John the Baptist, also in the Louvre.The overpainting transformed the image of St. John into one of a pagan deity, by converting the long-handled cross-like staff of the Baptist to a Bacchic thyrsus and adding a vine wreath. The fur robe is the legacy of John the Baptist, but has been overpainted with leopard-spots relating, like the wreath, to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine and intoxication.", "picture": "Vesica_351_1294894609", "thumb": "Vesica_351_1294894609_sm", "extension": "jpg", "user_id": "10", "piece_id": "351", "picture_date_added": "2011-01-13 04:56:49", "picture_date_last_updated": "2011-01-13 04:56:49", "file_size": "", "date": "0000-00-00", "photographer_id": "0", "copyright": "", "location": "", "url_www": "xxxxx/Vesica_351_1294894609.jpg", "thumbnail_view": "xxxxx/Vesica_351_1294894609_sm.jpg" } }, "files": [], "audio": [], "video": [], "bibliography": [], "vesica_gallery": "1", "local_gallery": "1", "date_added": "2011-01-13 04:48:22", "added_by_user_id": null, "added_by_user": "Sarfraz Khan", "date_updated": "2014-06-20 13:35:00", "updated_by_user_id": null, "updated_by_user": "Sarfraz Khan", "deaccession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "deaccession": "0" }, { "id": "551", "about": { "accession_no": "", "accession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "name": "A View of Theodosia", "description": "", "symbolism": "" }, "types": [ { "type": "Painting" } ], "techniques": [], "materials": [ { "material": "Canvas" } ], "colours": [], "dimensions": [], "weight": [], "artists": [ { "artist": "Ivan Aivazovsky" } ], "history": { "countries": [], "regions": [], "dynasties": [], "map_data": { "address": "theodosia, ukraine", "latitude": "45.0319330", "longitude": "35.3824330" }, "dates": { "year_of_origin_from": "1898", "year_of_origin_from_anno_domini": "AD", "year_of_origin_to": "0", "year_of_origin_to_anno_domini": "AD" }, "history": "" }, "labels": [], "tags": [], "related_pieces": [], "administrative": [], "acquisitions": [], "loans": [], "finance": [], "insurance": [], "shipping": [], "conservation": [], "exhibitions": [], "images": { "0": { "picture_id": "830", "picture_name": "", "picture_desc": "", "picture": "Vesica_551_1316717120", "thumb": "Vesica_551_1316717120_sm", "extension": "jpg", "user_id": "1", "piece_id": "551", "picture_date_added": "2011-09-22 19:45:20", "picture_date_last_updated": "2011-09-22 19:45:20", "file_size": "Array", "date": "0000-00-00", "photographer_id": "0", "copyright": "", "location": "", "url_www": "xxxxx/Vesica_551_1316717120.jpg", "thumbnail_view": "xxxxx/Vesica_551_1316717120_sm.jpg" }, "default": { "picture_id": "787", "picture_name": "A VIEW OF THEODOSIA", "picture_desc": "", "picture": "Vesica_551_1302629818", "thumb": "Vesica_551_1302629818_sm", "extension": "jpg", "user_id": "10", "piece_id": "551", "picture_date_added": "2011-04-12 18:36:58", "picture_date_last_updated": "2011-04-12 18:36:59", "file_size": "", "date": "0000-00-00", "photographer_id": "0", "copyright": "", "location": "", "url_www": "xxxxx/Vesica_551_1302629818.jpg", "thumbnail_view": "xxxxx/Vesica_551_1302629818_sm.jpg" } }, "files": [], "audio": [], "video": [], "bibliography": [], "vesica_gallery": "1", "local_gallery": "1", "date_added": "2011-04-12 18:25:30", "added_by_user_id": null, "added_by_user": "Sarfraz Khan", "date_updated": "2014-06-20 13:35:01", "updated_by_user_id": null, "updated_by_user": "Asif Nawaz", "deaccession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "deaccession": "0" } ], "ctotal_files": 1, "collection_files": [ { "collection_id": "19", "file_id": "1", "file_type_id": "7", "file_name": "Vesica_19_1309773268178017290945962.pdf", "file_name_1": "Insurance Policy 145896325", "file_desc": "", "file_size_kb": "657.03", "upload_date": "2011-07-04 10:54:28", "account_id": "1", "uploaded_by_user_id": "1", "file_type_name": "Portable Document Format", "extension": "pdf", "icon": "pdf.png", "user_id": "1" } ], "ctotal_audio_files": 1, "collection_audio_files": [ { "id": "1", "collection_id": "19", "file_id": "4", "file_type_id": "12", "file_name": "Vesica_19_1313762954825611063193295.mp3", "file_name_1": "Guide Chapter 1 - Stonehenge", "file_desc": "", "file_size_kb": "513.55", "file_length": "00:00:33", "upload_date": "2011-08-19 15:09:14", "account_id": "1", "uploaded_by_user_id": "1", "user_id": "1" } ], "ctotal_video_files": 4, "collection_video_files": [ { "id": "5", "collection_id": "19", "file_id": "30", "file_type_id": "18", "file_name": "https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRuLVs4abJ8", "file_name_1": "https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRuLVs4abJ8", "file_desc": "", "file_size_kb": "0.00", "file_length": "", "upload_date": "2014-03-06 02:16:31", "account_id": "1", "uploaded_by_user_id": "1", "is_external": "1", "file_type_name": "Flash Video", "extension": "flv", "icon": "flv.png", "user_id": "1" }, { "id": "4", "collection_id": "19", "file_id": "29", "file_type_id": "18", "file_name": "http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRuLVs4abJ8", "file_name_1": "http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRuLVs4abJ8", "file_desc": "", "file_size_kb": "0.00", "file_length": "", "upload_date": "2014-03-06 02:03:33", "account_id": "1", "uploaded_by_user_id": "1", "is_external": "1", "file_type_name": "Flash Video", "extension": "flv", "icon": "flv.png", "user_id": "1" }, { "id": "2", "collection_id": "19", "file_id": "2", "file_type_id": "19", "file_name": "Vesica_19_1313763121464122882389252.mp4", "file_name_1": "Aerial view", "file_desc": "", "file_size_kb": "25630.88", "file_length": "00:00:30", "upload_date": "2011-08-19 15:12:01", "account_id": "1", "uploaded_by_user_id": "1", "is_external": "0", "file_type_name": "MP4", "extension": "mp4", "icon": "mp4.png", "user_id": "1" }, { "id": "1", "collection_id": "19", "file_id": "1", "file_type_id": "19", "file_name": "Vesica_19_1313762395334642672686137.mp4", "file_name_1": "Close-up video", "file_desc": "adas", "file_size_kb": "3207.28", "file_length": "00:01:26", "upload_date": "2011-08-19 14:59:55", "account_id": "1", "uploaded_by_user_id": "1", "is_external": "0", "file_type_name": "MP4", "extension": "mp4", "icon": "mp4.png", "user_id": "1" } ], "collection_labels": null } ] }

 

/collections/collection_id - Returns details for the specified collection_id

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Example Request

                        GET https://api.vesica.ws/collections/234?user_api_key=123_akAsbuenASDWEads
                                                         &account_api_key=234_aoYOWFnweivn
                    

Example Request - JSON

                       {
                            "user_api_key": "123_auRNjALDN",
                            "account_api_key": "235_UIJdaiuU"
                        }
                    

Example Response

{
  "code": 200,
  "status": "OK",
  "data": {
    "id": "19",
    "cname": "Works by Raphael",
    "cdescription": "Line 1Line 2Line 3",
    "cdate_created": "2011-04-29 23:38:13",
    "cdate_last_updated": "2014-03-19 16:20:33",
    "cuser_id": "1",
    "cuser_last_updated": "1",
    "caccount_id": "1",
    "clocal_gallery": "1",
    "cvesica_gallery": "0",
    "cphoto": "xxxxx/collection-photos/Vesica_Collection_19.jpg",
    "cphoto_view": "xxxxx/collection-photos/Vesica_Collection_19.jpg",
    "ctotal_pieces": 28,
    "collection_pieces": [
      {
        "id": "383",
        "about": {
          "accession_no": "",
          "accession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00",
          "name": "Battle of Cascina (Michelangelo)",
          "description": "The painting was commissioned from Michelangelo by Piero Soderini, statesman of the Republic of Florence. It was intended to be a fresco painted on a wall of the Salone dei Cinquecento in Palazzo Vecchio. The opposite wall was to be decorated by Leonardo da Vinci, who was commissioned to depict the Battle of Anghiari. The two battles were notable medieval Florentine victories. The Battle of Cascina was fought on 28 July 1364 between the troops of Florence and Pisa, resulting in victory of the former. A thousand Pisans were killed and two thousand more were captured.

Michelangelo never completed the painting, but did produce a complete cartoon of the composition. The cartoon was copied by several artists, the most notable extant copy being by Michelangelo's pupil Sangallo. Some of Michelangelo's preparatory drawings also survive, along with prints of part of the scene by Marcantonio Raimondi. According to Michelangelo's biographer Giorgio Vasari the original cartoon was deliberately destroyed by Michelangelo's rival Bartolommeo Bandinelli because of his jealousy of its fame.
 ", "symbolism": "Michelangelo depicted a scene at the beginning of the battle when the Florentine army was initially taken by surprise when the Pisans attacked. He depicts Florentine soldiers bathing naked in the river Arno responding to a trumpet which warns them of the sudden Pisan attack. As the soldiers emerge from the river and buckle on their armour, they are threatened by shots from the Pisans. Several soldiers look or point towards the Pisan position to the left. One soldier has apparently been hit and fallen back into the river, while others leap energetically into action.

The chosen episode allowed Michelangelo to depict his favoured topic: the naked male figure in varieties of contrapposto." }, "types": [ { "type": "Painting" } ], "techniques": [], "materials": [ { "material": "Canvas" } ], "colours": [], "dimensions": [], "weight": [], "artists": [ { "artist": "Michelangelo Buonarroti" } ], "history": { "countries": [], "regions": [], "dynasties": [], "map_data": { "address": "", "latitude": "0.0000000", "longitude": "0.0000000" }, "dates": { "year_of_origin_from": "0", "year_of_origin_from_anno_domini": "AD", "year_of_origin_to": "0", "year_of_origin_to_anno_domini": "AD" }, "history": "" }, "labels": [], "tags": [], "related_pieces": [], "administrative": [], "acquisitions": [], "loans": [], "finance": [], "insurance": [], "shipping": [], "conservation": [], "exhibitions": [], "images": { "default": { "picture_id": "614", "picture_name": "Battle of Cascina", "picture_desc": "", "picture": "Vesica_383_1295447419", "thumb": "Vesica_383_1295447419_sm", "extension": "jpg", "user_id": "10", "piece_id": "383", "picture_date_added": "2011-01-19 14:30:19", "picture_date_last_updated": "2011-01-19 14:30:19", "file_size": "", "date": "0000-00-00", "photographer_id": "0", "copyright": "", "location": "", "url_www": "xxxxx/Vesica_383_1295447419.jpg", "thumbnail_view": "xxxxxthumbs/Vesica_383_1295447419_sm.jpg" } }, "files": [], "audio": [], "video": [], "bibliography": [], "vesica_gallery": "1", "local_gallery": "1", "date_added": "2011-01-19 14:12:07", "added_by_user_id": null, "added_by_user": "Sarfraz Khan", "date_updated": "2014-06-20 13:35:00", "updated_by_user_id": null, "updated_by_user": "Sarfraz Khan", "deaccession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "deaccession": "0" }, { "id": "239", "about": { "accession_no": "", "accession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "name": "Galatea (Raphael)", "description": "The Triumph of Galatea is a fresco masterpiece completed in 1512 by the Italian painter Raphael for the Villa Farnesina in Rome.
The Farnesina was built for the Sienese banker Agostino Chigi, one of the richest men of that age. The Farnese family later acquired and renamed the villa, smaller than the more ostentatious palazzo at the other side of the Tiber. The fresco is a mythological scene of a series embellishing the open gallery of the building, a series never completed which was inspired to the "Stanze per la giostra" of the poet Angelo Poliziano. In Greek mythology, the beautiful Nereid Galatea had fallen in love with the peasant shepherd Acis. Her consort, one-eyed giant, Polyphemus, after chancing upon the two lovers together, lobbed an enormous pillar and killed Acis.

Raphael did not paint any of the main events of the story. He chose the scene of the nymph's apotheosis (Stanze, I, 118-119). Galatea appears surrounded by other sea creatures whose forms are somewhat inspired by Michelangelo, whereas the bright colors and decoration are supposed to be inspired by ancient Roman painting. At the left, a Triton (partly man, partly fish) abducts a sea nymph; behind them, another Triton uses a shell as a trumpet. Galatea rides a shell-chariot drawn by two dolphins.

While some have seen in the model for Galatea the image of the courtesan, Imperia, Agostino Chigi's lover, Raphael's near-contemporary, the artist and art biographer Giorgio Vasari, wrote that Raphael did not mean for Galatea to resemble any one human person, but to represent ideal beauty. Her gaze is directed upward to heaven, reflecting Platonic love.", "symbolism": "Galatea appears surrounded by other sea creatures whose forms are somewhat inspired by Michelangelo, whereas the bright colors and decoration are supposed to be inspired by ancient Roman painting. At the left, a Triton (partly man, partly fish) abducts a sea nymph; behind them, another Triton uses a shell as a trumpet. Galatea rides a shell-chariot drawn by two dolphins.

While some have seen in the model for Galatea the image of the courtesan, Imperia, Agostino Chigi's lover, Raphael's near-contemporary, the artist and art biographer Giorgio Vasari, wrote that Raphael did not mean for Galatea to resemble any one human person, but to represent ideal beauty. Her gaze is directed upward to heaven, reflecting Platonic love." }, "types": [ { "type": "Painting" } ], "techniques": [], "materials": [], "colours": [], "dimensions": [], "weight": [], "artists": [ { "artist": "Raphael" } ], "history": { "countries": [], "regions": [], "dynasties": [], "map_data": { "address": "", "latitude": "0.0000000", "longitude": "0.0000000" }, "dates": { "year_of_origin_from": "1512", "year_of_origin_from_anno_domini": "AD", "year_of_origin_to": "1513", "year_of_origin_to_anno_domini": "AD" }, "history": "Raphael did not paint any of the main events of the story. He chose the scene of the nymph's apotheosis (Stanze, I, 118-119). Galatea appears surrounded by other sea creatures whose forms are somewhat inspired by Michelangelo, whereas the bright colors and decoration are supposed to be inspired by ancient Roman painting. At the left, a Triton (partly man, partly fish) abducts a sea nymph; behind them, another Triton uses a shell as a trumpet. Galatea rides a shell-chariot drawn by two dolphins.

While some have seen in the model for Galatea the image of the courtesan, Imperia, Agostino Chigi's lover, Raphael's near-contemporary, the artist and art biographer Giorgio Vasari, wrote that Raphael did not mean for Galatea to resemble any one human person, but to represent ideal beauty. Her gaze is directed upward to heaven, reflecting Platonic love." }, "labels": [], "tags": [], "related_pieces": [], "administrative": [], "acquisitions": [], "loans": [], "finance": [], "insurance": [], "shipping": [], "conservation": [], "exhibitions": [], "images": { "default": { "picture_id": "459", "picture_name": "Galatea", "picture_desc": "", "picture": "Vesica_239_1291720995", "thumb": "Vesica_239_1291720995_sm", "extension": "jpg", "user_id": "10", "piece_id": "239", "picture_date_added": "2010-12-07 11:23:15", "picture_date_last_updated": "2010-12-07 11:23:15", "file_size": "", "date": "0000-00-00", "photographer_id": "0", "copyright": "", "location": "", "url_www": "xxxxx/Vesica_239_1291720995.jpg", "thumbnail_view": "xxxxxthumbs/Vesica_239_1291720995_sm.jpg" } }, "files": [], "audio": [], "video": [], "bibliography": [], "vesica_gallery": "1", "local_gallery": "1", "date_added": "2010-12-07 10:52:16", "added_by_user_id": null, "added_by_user": "Sarfraz Khan", "date_updated": "2014-06-20 13:34:59", "updated_by_user_id": null, "updated_by_user": "Sarfraz Khan", "deaccession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "deaccession": "0" }, { "id": "309", "about": { "accession_no": "", "accession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "name": "A Girl in the Street, Two Coaches in the Background", "description": "A Girl in the Street, Two Coaches in the Background is an oil painting created in 1882 by Vincent van Gogh.", "symbolism": "" }, "types": [ { "type": "Painting" } ], "techniques": [], "materials": [ { "material": "Canvas" } ], "colours": [], "dimensions": [], "weight": [], "artists": [ { "artist": "Vincent van Gogh" } ], "history": { "countries": [], "regions": [], "dynasties": [], "map_data": { "address": "madrid", "latitude": "40.4167754", "longitude": "-3.7037902" }, "dates": { "year_of_origin_from": "1882", "year_of_origin_from_anno_domini": "AD", "year_of_origin_to": "0", "year_of_origin_to_anno_domini": "AD" }, "history": "" }, "labels": [], "tags": [], 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"0000-00-00 00:00:00", "deaccession": "0" }, { "id": "314", "about": { "accession_no": "", "accession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "name": "A Wind-Beaten Tree", "description": "A Wind-Beaten Tree is an oil painting created in 1883 by Vincent van Gogh.", "symbolism": "" }, "types": [ { "type": "Painting" } ], "techniques": [], "materials": [ { "material": "Canvas" } ], "colours": [], "dimensions": [], "weight": [], "artists": [ { "artist": "Vincent van Gogh" } ], "history": { "countries": [], "regions": [], "dynasties": [], "map_data": { "address": "madrid, spain", "latitude": "40.4167754", "longitude": "-3.7037902" }, "dates": { "year_of_origin_from": "1883", "year_of_origin_from_anno_domini": "AD", "year_of_origin_to": "0", "year_of_origin_to_anno_domini": "AD" }, "history": "" }, "labels": [], "tags": [], "related_pieces": [], "administrative": [], "acquisitions": [], "loans": [], "finance": [], "insurance": [], "shipping": [], "conservation": [], "exhibitions": [], "images": { "default": { "picture_id": "541", "picture_name": "A Wind-Beaten Tree", "picture_desc": "", "picture": "Vesica_314_1294676182", "thumb": "Vesica_314_1294676182_sm", "extension": "jpg", "user_id": "10", "piece_id": "314", "picture_date_added": "2011-01-10 16:16:22", "picture_date_last_updated": "2011-01-10 16:16:22", "file_size": "", "date": "0000-00-00", "photographer_id": "0", "copyright": "", "location": "", "url_www": "xxxxx/Vesica_314_1294676182.jpg", } }, "files": [], "audio": [], "video": [], "bibliography": [], "vesica_gallery": "1", "local_gallery": "1", "date_added": "2011-01-10 16:12:35", "added_by_user_id": null, "added_by_user": "Sarfraz Khan", "date_updated": "2014-06-20 13:35:00", "updated_by_user_id": null, "updated_by_user": "Asif Nawaz", "deaccession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "deaccession": "0" }, { "id": "351", "about": { "accession_no": "", "accession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "name": "Bacchus (Leonardo)", "description": "Bacchus, formerly Saint John the Baptist, in the Musée du Louvre is based on a drawing by the Italian Renaissance artist Leonardo da Vinci but is presumed to have been executed by an unknown follower, perhaps in Leonardo's workshop. Sidney J. Freedberg assigns the drawing to Leonardo's second Milan period. Among the Lombard painters who have been suggested as possible authors are Cesare da Sesto, Marco d'Oggiono, Francesco Melzi, and Cesare Bernazzano. The painting shows a male figure with garlanded head and leopard skin, seated in an idyllic landscape. He points with his right hand off to the right, and with his left hand grasps his thyrsus.

 ", "symbolism": "The painting originally depicted John the Baptist. In the late seventeenth century, between the years 1683 and 1693, it was overpainted and altered, to serve as Bacchus.

Cassiano dal Pozzo remarked of the painting in its former state, which he saw at Fontainebleau in 1625, that it had neither devotion, decorum nor similitude,] the suavely beautiful, youthful and slightly androgynous Giovannino was so at variance with artistic conventions in portraying the Baptist— neither the older ascetic prophet nor the Florentine baby Giovannino, but a type of Leonardo's invention, of a disconcerting, somewhat ambiguous sensuality, familiar in Leonardo's half-length and upward-pointing Saint John the Baptist, also in the Louvre.

The overpainting transformed the image of St. John into one of a pagan deity, by converting the long-handled cross-like staff of the Baptist to a Bacchic thyrsus and adding a vine wreath. The fur robe is the legacy of John the Baptist, but has been overpainted with leopard-spots relating, like the wreath, to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine and intoxication." }, "types": [ { "type": "Painting" } ], "techniques": [], "materials": [ { "material": "Canvas" }, { "material": "Wood" } ], "colours": [], "dimensions": [], "weight": [], "artists": [ { "artist": "Leonardo da Vinci" } ], "history": { "countries": [], "regions": [], "dynasties": [], "map_data": { "address": "", "latitude": "0.0000000", "longitude": "0.0000000" }, "dates": { "year_of_origin_from": "1510", "year_of_origin_from_anno_domini": "AD", "year_of_origin_to": "1515", "year_of_origin_to_anno_domini": "AD" }, "history": "" }, "labels": [], "tags": [], "related_pieces": [], "administrative": [], "acquisitions": [], "loans": [], "finance": [], "insurance": [], "shipping": [], "conservation": [], "exhibitions": [], "images": { "default": { "picture_id": "580", "picture_name": " Bacchus (Leonardo)", "picture_desc": " The painting originally depicted John the Baptist. 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The fur robe is the legacy of John the Baptist, but has been overpainted with leopard-spots relating, like the wreath, to Bacchus, the Roman god of wine and intoxication.", "picture": "Vesica_351_1294894609", "thumb": "Vesica_351_1294894609_sm", "extension": "jpg", "user_id": "10", "piece_id": "351", "picture_date_added": "2011-01-13 04:56:49", "picture_date_last_updated": "2011-01-13 04:56:49", "file_size": "", "date": "0000-00-00", "photographer_id": "0", "copyright": "", "location": "", } }, "files": [], "audio": [], "video": [], "bibliography": [], "vesica_gallery": "1", "local_gallery": "1", "date_added": "2011-01-13 04:48:22", "added_by_user_id": null, "added_by_user": "Sarfraz Khan", "date_updated": "2014-06-20 13:35:00", "updated_by_user_id": null, "updated_by_user": "Sarfraz Khan", "deaccession_date": "0000-00-00 00:00:00", "deaccession": "0" } ], "ctotal_files": 1, "collection_files": [ { "id": "1", "collection_id": "19", "file_id": "1", "file_type_id": "7", "file_name": "Vesica_19_1309773268178017290945962.pdf", "file_name_1": "Insurance Policy 145896325", "file_desc": "", "file_size_kb": "657.03", "upload_date": "2011-07-04 10:54:28", "account_id": "1", "uploaded_by_user_id": "1", "file_type_name": "Portable Document Format", "extension": "pdf", "icon": "pdf.png", "user_id": "1" } ], "ctotal_audio_files": 1, "collection_audio_files": [ { "id": "1", "collection_id": "19", "file_id": "4", "file_type_id": "12", "file_name": "Vesica_19_1313762954825611063193295.mp3", "file_name_1": "Guide Chapter 1 - Stonehenge", "file_desc": "", "file_size_kb": "513.55", "file_length": "00:00:33", "upload_date": "2011-08-19 15:09:14", "account_id": "1", "uploaded_by_user_id": "1", "user_id": "1" } ], "ctotal_video_files": 4, "collection_video_files": [ { "id": "5", "collection_id": "19", "file_id": "30", "file_type_id": "18", "file_name": "https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRuLVs4abJ8", "file_name_1": "https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRuLVs4abJ8", "file_desc": "", "file_size_kb": "0.00", "file_length": "", "upload_date": "2014-03-06 02:16:31", "account_id": "1", "uploaded_by_user_id": "1", "is_external": "1", "file_type_name": "Flash Video", "extension": "flv", "icon": "flv.png", "user_id": "1" }, { "id": "4", "collection_id": "19", "file_id": "29", "file_type_id": "18", "file_name": "http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRuLVs4abJ8", "file_name_1": "http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRuLVs4abJ8", "file_desc": "", "file_size_kb": "0.00", "file_length": "", "upload_date": "2014-03-06 02:03:33", "account_id": "1", "uploaded_by_user_id": "1", "is_external": "1", "file_type_name": "Flash Video", "extension": "flv", "icon": "flv.png", "user_id": "1" }, { "id": "2", "collection_id": "19", "file_id": "2", "file_type_id": "19", "file_name": "Vesica_19_1313763121464122882389252.mp4", "file_name_1": "Aerial view", "file_desc": "", "file_size_kb": "25630.88", "file_length": "00:00:30", "upload_date": "2011-08-19 15:12:01", "account_id": "1", "uploaded_by_user_id": "1", "is_external": "0", "file_type_name": "MP4", "extension": "mp4", "icon": "mp4.png", "user_id": "1" }, { "id": "1", "collection_id": "19", "file_id": "1", "file_type_id": "19", "file_name": "Vesica_19_1313762395334642672686137.mp4", "file_name_1": "Close-up video", "file_desc": "adas", "file_size_kb": "3207.28", "file_length": "00:01:26", "upload_date": "2011-08-19 14:59:55", "account_id": "1", "uploaded_by_user_id": "1", "is_external": "0", "file_type_name": "MP4", "extension": "mp4", "icon": "mp4.png", "user_id": "1" } ], "collection_labels": null } }